Author Topic: How did you discover Man?  (Read 41447 times)

Barry Island

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How did you discover Man?
« on: January 08, 2014, 08:19:46 PM »
On a bit of a roll today so curious to know how others discovered the Man band. My introduction came courtesy of my best friend at the time who I shall call Sleek as he was known then. Sleek was a bit better off than most of us - something to do with being the heir to a carpet fortune so was always well sorted with new albums to listen to and he was a really nice guy so was happy to lend them out. Trouble was he wasn't the best at looking after them so it was sometimes difficult to reciprocate. Anyway one day he lent me three or four and amongst them was Man's 3rd album. I was shocked due to the risqué album cover and the immense scratches on both sides. I lived in permanent fear of my mother seeing the cover and being shocked and my father seeing it and confirming his worst fears about the degenerate path I was following. Anyway I popped it on the old Dansette and was immediately transfixed by the variety of sounds on one album - just couldn't believe it and played it constantly - can remember to this day lying in front of the gas fire listening to 'Would the Christians...' over and over again. For me life would never be the same again and I promptly swapped it for my pristine copy of Lizard by King Crimson and never looked back. When was your moment of enlightenment? Oh and Sleek if you are out there somewhere get in touch it would be great to catch up.
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Colin Salter

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Re: How did you discover Man?
« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2014, 08:48:32 PM »
When I started at senior school, the boys in the Junior Common Room had a record player and had Greasy Truckers Party on heavy rotation. We weren't allowed into the JCR, but the corridor was filled with Spunk Rock. That was all it took. My first two albums were In Search of Space and Be Good To Yourself, followed by Humble Pie Rockin' The Filmore and Rory Gallagher Live! In Europe and then finally, when I tracked down a copy, Greasy Truckers Party. No turning back!

Barry Island

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Re: How did you discover Man?
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2014, 09:00:14 PM »
Cracking albums to start off with - Hawkwind were also very popular at the time. Reminds me of the funniest graffiti I ever saw in a toilet cubicle one. Someone had written 'Hawkwind' and then some wag had added a question mark and below added 'No Tandoori Chicken'. You had to be there I guess. Sorry am I deviating again?. I wonder how many hours people have spent in total enjoying the cover to 'Be Good to Yourself' ? Should distribute copies in some of the world's troublespots just to quieten things down in my opinion.
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joan

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Re: How did you discover Man?
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2014, 09:35:11 PM »
I discovered Man in 1986 when I was a big fan of Dire Straits and wanted to listen to other recordings of their drummer.
First LP I bought was "Slow motion" and the second to come was the spanish compilation "Golden hour of man" I think.

Barry Island

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Re: How did you discover Man?
« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2014, 09:42:22 PM »
Nice one Joan. Terry Williams is my favourite all time drummer. What hooked me was the drumming on Spunk Rock on Greasy Truckers. He really seemed to be flying and I just couldn't, and never have got over, how one guy could push a tune along with such amazing effect. Nobody comes close in my opinion. It is no surprise he has always been in demand.
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Mike Morgan

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Re: How did you discover Man?
« Reply #5 on: January 09, 2014, 12:07:03 AM »
I was about 15 and my older brother came home from the Patti (I declined it because I wanted to play football in the local park.  We live. We learn!) and he talked about this amazing guitarist who could play spacey solos and sing along with them in perfect tune.  Can't think who that could possibly have been ;D.  Later that year BGTY was released and on the strength of my brother's reccommendation, I asked for it as a Christmas pressie.

It wasn't that I was dissapointed with what I heard, but I'd never heard a sound like it but two or three listens in I was hooked.  Being a local band, a load of people from my school got into them and in no time at all the 'Mananas' smiley face had been painted onto a polystyrene tile and was hanging up on the common room wall.

Tidy!

joan

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Re: How did you discover Man?
« Reply #6 on: January 09, 2014, 12:52:42 AM »
Nice one Joan. Terry Williams is my favourite all time drummer. What hooked me was the drumming on Spunk Rock on Greasy Truckers. He really seemed to be flying and I just couldn't, and never have got over, how one guy could push a tune along with such amazing effect. Nobody comes close in my opinion. It is no surprise he has always been in demand.
The Man vets have known the band since the beginning or almost, and have had the chance to live the evolution in the songs and the changes in the line-ups. How lucky.
Greasy Truckers was one of the last albums for me to get so it's not special for me as it is for all of you. My first live LP was AWTEW and then MD. My favorite Spunk rock is the one in AWTEW and also the one from BITF.
Anyway when I first listened to Greasy Truckers I thought Terry was using a double pedal for the bass drum. Then Terry told me he has never used one so... it's obvious... he's the fastest right foot in the world...


Rob W

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Re: How did you discover Man?
« Reply #7 on: January 09, 2014, 11:59:24 AM »
 I too was introduced to Man by a close pal.

I had only recently progressed from buying pop singles to my first two LP's, Alice Cooper School's Out and David Bowie Aladdin Sane (and my mum freaked when she saw that cover!). Then he intrduced me to Deep Purple, ed Zep and the usual suspects.

Then one Sunday in 74 (ashamedly, the date which has been etched in my memory, has suddenly gone), he phoned me, aid he was going to a gig, do I want to come with? Too right I did. My first proper gig. Who's the band I asked? Man he said. Who the hell's that I would have said, or words to that effect.

What do I wear for a gig? Didn't have a clue. Nieve or what? I remember I wore a blue denim jacket on which I had felt tipped BURY FC OK on, and I had a bottle green Flowerpot Men tyope hat, which I had brought because Roger Glover had one similar. I probably looked a right t*ss*r (no change there I suppose). And it transpired Glover's hat he wore was nothing like mine anyway. But hey ho,

 So I called into his house early doors, and he put BGTY on for me. Oh Jeez, fine, we'llsee!!!

The gig at The Palace Theatre, M/cr, was sparsely populated, and my only memories of that gig, are of the band, behind the closed curtain, and the crowd, bantering with  each other until the curtains opened; MJ (though I didn't have a clue who he was at the time) on stage right, and a group of girls in the posh seats screaming to him; a bottle of wine being passed along the row of seats I was on which we all had a swig of (f*ck knows what was in it!); and the crowd going to stand at the front for the encore which I think was bananas (must look at Mannerisms again).

Game Set and Match to Man. I was hooked. For those who know me, love of the band and spin off groups, friendships made etc etc the rest is history. 

As for my pal. We both got married, moved areas, and lost touch as can happen. But incredibly, we were introduced back to each other by another pal, late 90's early 2000's. We only now lived about 3 streets apart. Met up, and I took him to a Man gig in Wrexham. It was attended by about 20 punters and a dog. I was so embarrassed. But he loved it, and even joined Deke on the merch stall for a bit.

He sadly died a few years back in tragic circumstances. A great friend, a great bloke, and he played a very major part in the route my life took.

Cheers Clarkey     


       

Andrew P

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Re: How did you discover Man?
« Reply #8 on: January 09, 2014, 01:31:29 PM »
I was asked this question a couple of times over pre-gig drinks at The Brunswick last month. It's early 1973 and I'm already into Hawkwind via a mate's obsession and LP collection, and I'm over at another mate's house of an evening when someone brings in Greasy Truckers and puts the Hawkwind bit on. All very good. Then the Man side goes on, and I'm listening thinking it doesn't sound much like Hawkwind, what's going on? I'm told it's Man, and this is Spunk Rock, their best song. So, where are they from, I say, thinking they are from the USA. Er - they are a Swansea band, is the reply, implying Muppetness on my part. Wow. So the next record on is "Christmas At The Patti" with its £1.43 price label on the cover. What? This band has made a recording a few miles from my home? Gotta listen. Initially a bit disappointed as it's all pub-rock on the first side, which was only just beginning to touch my consciousness, but it grew on me. The only other Man LPs I recall hearing in 1973/4 were BGTY and RWL, but to be brutally honest they didn't make much impression on my teenage mind, certainly nothing like GT had. Then they drifted away from my consciousness and I just lost track of Man until around 1993 when a mate suggested we go see Man at the Patti Pavilion. What? They are still around? Well that gig rekindled my interest and it's been no looking back since then. Living in Swansea I managed to spend a lot of time watching live bands with Man connections - Contraband, Tremblin' Knees, etc., and I even saw Martin Ace playing bass with Cromlech at the Swansea Folk Club around 1979.

First proper gig? Let's discount The Fireflies in 1964 as they were the warm-up act for the municipal fireworks display and I was only 7, but I do remember watching The Bystanders playing at Singleton Park Boating Lake around 1967. No, first real gig, seeing a big name band, was Status Quo at the Top Rank in Swansea in January 1974.
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Arjayay

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Re: How did you discover Man?
« Reply #9 on: January 09, 2014, 03:26:11 PM »
I'm another one who was introduced via "Trucker's"
I was already into Hawkwind, influenced by older boys at school, and remembered reading about the Brinsley Schwarz "Hype" although I didn't really know what they sounded like
I saw Truckers advertised in the NME and that it was a limited edition - I only had pocket-money - but here but a double album for £1.50 - cheaper than most single albums
Bought it at "Downtown Records" in Romford, just along from the "South Street, Romford, Shopping Arcade" in Ian Dury's "Razzle in my pocket" and still have this vinyl copy.
My biggest Man related disappointment? Buying the 2007 CD box set of Truckers and finding that, having waited 35 years to hear the beginning of Spunk Rock, it wasn't on there 

Mark Oakley

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Re: How did you discover Man?
« Reply #10 on: January 09, 2014, 04:17:14 PM »
I can't remember if I'm honest...but think it was either thru hearing the GT version of Spunk Rock at a mate's house in Stalybridge (which prompted the swap for Genesis Live mentioned on the 'regreattable sales' thread)...or thru purchasing BGTY purely on the strength of the fabulous cover and fold-out map. Those were certainly my first two Man albums anyway.
Saw them five years in succession in Manchester in the 70s...including the Cippolina tour...with Deke seemingly appearing on alternate occasions. Back then I preferred the sans Deke line-ups...which always seemed more psychedelic somehow. Post the mid-90s, when I finally realised they were back together and still touring, I was happy with any line-up. It was the Star Club live CD which really rejuvenated my passion. Still my favourite I think...save for the dreadful 'Something In My Heart..."

Mike Morgan

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Re: How did you discover Man?
« Reply #11 on: January 09, 2014, 04:29:12 PM »

My biggest Man related disappointment? Buying the 2007 CD box set of Truckers and finding that, having waited 35 years to hear the beginning of Spunk Rock, it wasn't on there

RJ,  If I remember correctly, I read that the tapeing (how the hell is that spelt?  I've tried a few options and none of them look right) hadn't started from the beginning, so it's just not available rather than left out.  A work of flawed genius!

rockprof

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Re: How did you discover Man?
« Reply #12 on: January 09, 2014, 04:38:18 PM »
From a chap at school in 1974. Heard C'mon from BITF and that was that.

Rob W

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Re: How did you discover Man?
« Reply #13 on: January 09, 2014, 05:29:26 PM »
From a chap at school in 1974. Heard C'mon from BITF and that was that.

Less is more.

 Not that I'd know anything about that 

::)

Ade Angove

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Re: How did you discover Man?
« Reply #14 on: January 09, 2014, 05:42:52 PM »
I have been there since the beginning ... my band from Penarth in the late 1960s (Stone Idol) gigged all over Wales ... if the time was right we would stop in Swansea for an egg and chips at a late night greasy spoon caff that stayed open for bands until about 3am ... every table was full of musicians and we often bumped into The Bystanders on their way back to Merthyr, or Silence (Mott the Hoople) heading back to Hereford.

We also supported Dream on dozens of occasions and knew Deke, Martin, Terry and Wes well. We heard the rumours on the grapevine that the Bystanders were metamorphising into Man and I caught about their second or third ever gig ... we were in the audience at Langland Bay when the album was recorded ... and I was front and centre at the Paget Rooms when that album was recorded.

When a later band of mine (Spike) was touring Switzerland and Germany in 1971 we criss crossed and bumped into the Manband several times in Zurich and Munich and hung out with the boys. The last version of my band (glam rockers Ingroville) supported Man on at least a dozen occasions.

When I joined the real world and became an RAF officer I lost track of Man and didn't rediscover them until 1993 when I saw them play twice at the Axe and Cleaver, Boston, in Scunthorpe and several times at the 100 Club, London. Man has provided the soundtrack to my life.