Author Topic: Roundhouse Documentary  (Read 19348 times)

happytrails

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Re: Roundhouse Documentary
« Reply #15 on: November 25, 2016, 01:44:26 PM »
That was when Canned Heat were supported by Upp and Sam Apple Pie...

No Mr Trails, it was 1975, Mandel's brief second spell. Can't remember who was supporting.

May 9, 1975: Roundhouse, Chalk Farm, London, UK with Broken Glass
 CANNED HEAT #8 (JAN 1973 - 1975)
1) Bob Hite
2) Henry Vestine
3) Adolfo de la Parra
4) James Shane
5) Edward 'Ed' 'Eddie' Beyer keyboards
6) Richard James Hite bass
http://rockprosopography102.blogspot.co.uk/2010/03/canned-heat-performance-list-work-in.html
But no mention of the Roundhouse gig we saw.

Nick Nation

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Re: Roundhouse Documentary
« Reply #16 on: November 27, 2016, 09:23:16 PM »
Definitely wasn't that line up that I saw. I think that was the previous....Will have a think.

However you may meanwhile enjoy that particular line up here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQPrDrDndh4
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happytrails

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Re: Roundhouse Documentary
« Reply #17 on: November 28, 2016, 11:31:30 AM »
Definitely wasn't that line up that I saw. I think that was the previous....Will have a think.

However you may meanwhile enjoy that particular line up here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQPrDrDndh4
Don't think the gig listing is that accurate Nick. There's no mention of the gig we saw in Croydon either...have seen your link before and it's brilliant...well I like it a lot.
Happy Trails to you.

Barry Island

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Re: Roundhouse Documentary
« Reply #18 on: November 28, 2016, 05:24:42 PM »
Ok, other than Man, who is the best group you've seen at The original Roundhouse during the 70s?

I'd vote for Canned Heat during the Harvey Mandel era.
Alkatraz!
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Nick Nation

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Re: Roundhouse Documentary
« Reply #19 on: November 28, 2016, 08:12:22 PM »
Alkatraz!

Ohh yes definitely! Thinking of you Will.

It was too loud and too heavy metal for me, having been brought up on the subtlety of Burgers and Phosphorescent Rat. j     

Yes, it was a bad day for good music when Jack and Jorma got matching Flying V guitars. On balance I'd say 'America's Choice' is my favourite.
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Jon M

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Re: Roundhouse Documentary
« Reply #20 on: November 29, 2016, 11:40:54 AM »
best band seen at the round house? I did not see many but Chilli Willi and his red hot peppers would be about best, great range of material and fabulous guitarists, Phil Lithman and Martin Stone.



happytrails

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Re: Roundhouse Documentary
« Reply #21 on: November 29, 2016, 07:13:25 PM »
Alkatraz!

Ohh yes definitely! Thinking of you Will.

It was too loud and too heavy metal for me, having been brought up on the subtlety of Burgers and Phosphorescent Rat. j     

Yes, it was a bad day for good music when Jack and Jorma got matching Flying V guitars. On balance I'd say 'America's Choice' is my favourite.
Wow...does it really make that much difference what guitars they chose to use? I just love Hot Tuna..Electric or Acoustic.
« Last Edit: November 29, 2016, 07:15:03 PM by happytrails »

Nick Nation

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Re: Roundhouse Documentary
« Reply #22 on: November 29, 2016, 09:30:54 PM »
I just love Hot Tuna..Electric or Acoustic.

Yes me too - I have all the LPs up to Final Vinyl, but I think there was a point that the electric stuff got a bit too heavy and lumpy!

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Barry Island

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Re: Roundhouse Documentary
« Reply #23 on: November 30, 2016, 08:00:15 PM »
America's Choice still rocks it for me! Great cover too 👍
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Jon M

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Re: Roundhouse Documentary
« Reply #24 on: January 04, 2017, 07:48:02 PM »
Well, still on the Hot Tuna ; after the roundhouse gig I think that the next Hot Tuna gig in london was at the Mean Fiddler in the early 90s, a more relaxed affair and a very long set; any more attendees out there?
 

happytrails

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Re: Roundhouse Documentary
« Reply #25 on: January 05, 2017, 07:21:54 PM »
Well, still on the Hot Tuna ; after the roundhouse gig I think that the next Hot Tuna gig in london was at the Mean Fiddler in the early 90s, a more relaxed affair and a very long set; any more attendees out there?
Nope, but did see Jorma perform a solo acoustic gig at Dingwalls in the early 80's...and it was brilliant.

Rob the Organ

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Re: Roundhouse Documentary
« Reply #26 on: January 17, 2018, 12:31:05 AM »
Well, still on the Hot Tuna ; after the roundhouse gig I think that the next Hot Tuna gig in london was at the Mean Fiddler in the early 90s, a more relaxed affair and a very long set; any more attendees out there?

Sorry for the delay - but yes, I was there. It was the Pair A Dice Found line-up, as I recall, and did Jorma have a lap steel as well as regular guitars?

I remember a couple of wags behind me quipping that Jack Casady "won't open his mouth all night, not even to say hello" and cheerfully shouting "Sing us a song, Jack!" between numbers.

I think Jack had just started using that gold Gibson Les Paul Signature bass. Who'da thunk it'd be recreated as a signature instrument and become the four-string of choice for our own dear departed Ken Whaley...

Coincidentally, the instrument is currently celebrating 20 years in production (AND Jack has become far more chatty!): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OfALj52cVow

That video shows Jack and Jorma are in stupidly good nick for their years, and sounding great. For me Burgers is the one - it's got it all, the fingerpicked blues, some electric guitar and some great songs. Agree with Jon M - not so fond of the heavier era, although I recall liking that song Easy Now on Phosphorescent Rat a lot, it reminded me of late period Airplane. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cUQm0_cwGL0
« Last Edit: January 17, 2018, 12:37:58 AM by Rob Millis »

Jon M

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Re: Roundhouse Documentary
« Reply #27 on: January 23, 2018, 11:17:11 PM »
jack Casady speak? no expectations there as it was the same for phil lesh and many others playing that instrument from the low register.
Burgers agreed as the best lp with phosphorescent rat being second, mainly as the Jorma K loved up lp ('living just for you' with steel drums), thereafter...

At around the same time of the hot Tuna Roundhouse gig in september 76 John Curd (?) was promoting a QMS gig at the same venue which never happened ; anybody know more about why it did not happen?
there was a poster exhibition, griffin, mouse and co, at the same time, summer of 76, and i remember seeing a poster for the QMS gig.


   

Rob the Organ

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Re: Roundhouse Documentary
« Reply #28 on: January 29, 2018, 01:53:11 AM »
jack Casady speak? no expectations there as it was the same for phil lesh and many others playing that instrument from the low register.
Burgers agreed as the best lp with phosphorescent rat being second, mainly as the Jorma K loved up lp ('living just for you' with steel drums), thereafter...

At around the same time of the hot Tuna Roundhouse gig in september 76 John Curd (?) was promoting a QMS gig at the same venue which never happened ; anybody know more about why it did not happen?
there was a poster exhibition, griffin, mouse and co, at the same time, summer of 76, and i remember seeing a poster for the QMS gig.


 

QMS: No, but I dread to think what passed for QMS by 1976. Even the Solid Silver album is awful, and I don't think JC hung around much longer than the recording of it. We know Deke's opinion of post Happy Trails QMS and IMO by and large he has it right. Was talking to Allan Heron on this very matter recently and we found that of all the Dino era LPs, the last one of the original run - "Comin' Thru" - was about the best. Chuck Steaks was on board playing Hammond by this time and he did at least seemingly provide a sparring partner for Duncan. "South California Correctional Facility Blues" is recorded live, and this is the best track but even the others aren't QUITE as bad as anything on Just For Love or What About Me. Although Allan (who will no doubt chip in, afeared I am talking about him in vain) made the observation of "yeah, not too bad but not QMS as we love it" and he's not wrong - but it IS nice to hear the instrumentalists more to the fore again.

Silent bassists: I've always found Lesh to be one of the most voluble of the Dead? I have to say having a Fender Precision around my neck has never stopped my trap functioning  ;)


Rob the Organ

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Re: Roundhouse Documentary
« Reply #29 on: January 29, 2018, 02:40:45 AM »
jack Casady speak? no expectations there as it was the same for phil lesh and many others playing that instrument from the low register.
Burgers agreed as the best lp with phosphorescent rat being second, mainly as the Jorma K loved up lp ('living just for you' with steel drums), thereafter...

At around the same time of the hot Tuna Roundhouse gig in september 76 John Curd (?) was promoting a QMS gig at the same venue which never happened ; anybody know more about why it did not happen?
there was a poster exhibition, griffin, mouse and co, at the same time, summer of 76, and i remember seeing a poster for the QMS gig.


 

QMS: No, but I dread to think what passed for QMS by 1976. Even the Solid Silver album is awful, and I don't think JC hung around much longer than the recording of it. We know Deke's opinion of post Happy Trails QMS and IMO by and large he has it right. Was talking to Allan Heron on this very matter recently and we found that of all the Dino era LPs, the last one of the original run - "Comin' Thru" - was about the best. Chuck Steaks was on board playing Hammond by this time and he did at least seemingly provide a sparring partner for Duncan. "South California Correctional Facility Blues" is recorded live, and this is the best track but even the others aren't QUITE as bad as anything on Just For Love or What About Me. Although Allan (who will no doubt chip in, afeared I am talking about him in vain) made the observation of "yeah, not too bad but not QMS as we love it" and he's not wrong - but it IS nice to hear the instrumentalists more to the fore again.

Silent bassists: I've always found Lesh to be one of the most voluble of the Dead? I have to say having a Fender Precision around my neck has never stopped my trap functioning  ;)

Can't leave this as it is because a bit of delving reveals that Wiki says that "Comin' Thru" is generally regarded as their weakest effort, and I have just spoken up for it! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comin%27_Thru

I think it depends what you want from QMS. If you regard a shift towards fairly derivative bog-standard turn of the decade jam band tactics as a step backwards from Valenti's polished, troubadour-like posturings on the 1970-71 LPs, then I can see how you'd agree with Wiki because it IS a lazier effort, and DOES have all the hallmarks of a contractual obligation fulfiller; however if you are prepared to take far less crafted material in return for more of Duncan's guitar and some perfectly presentable bluesy Hammond as a post-Cipollina foil for Duncan, and generally find more grit to the actual sound of the band again - even if a little sub-Santana, especially on the opening track (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tzCnwXGO8TY- then I think you'll find moments of Comin' Thru generally DO appeal more than Just For Love, What About Me and Quicksilver (not to be confused with the seminal debut; this is a one word album title).

The 1972 Rolling Stone is none too kind, but despite the opening paragraphs being spot on, the fact that he says that the fine guitars of QMS never made it to vinyl - making a point of discounting Happy Trails for an unspecified reason, and never even mentioning the debut - reveal him to be a pig ignorant twat.
https://www.rollingstone.com/music/albumreviews/comin-thru-19720608

As I said below, I think the rawness of this track in particular has far more to commend it than most of the previous two years: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XdBM7Ykw8Ec

Anywhere - here's the friggin' lot: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6qOehBuujoE